1970-72 Chevrolet Corvette Stingray (C3)

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I saw this beautiful Corvette Stingray convertible on my way home from work a few days ago. I love my Celica convertible, but I couldn’t help feeling just a little jealous of this convertible…

The chrome bumpers on both front (you can see a tiny glint of chrome in front of the wheel) and rear indicate that this Corvette is, at the newest, a 1972 model. The chrome on the front was dropped in ’73 and the rear was restyled with an integrated plastic bumper for ’74. The last year for round exhaust cutouts was 1969, so this Corvette was built somewhere between 1970 and 1972.

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1971 Volkswagen Type 2 (T2)

Another find in southern Utah. This second generation (T2) VW Bus is easily identified as an early production model (1968-1971) by the front turn signals being mounted below the headlights. In 1971 the Type 2 received front disc brakes, along with new wheels that had brake ventilation holes, as seen on this example. Assuming the wheels are original and haven’t been retrofitted to an earlier model, we can narrow down the year to 1971.

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1974-89 Mercedes-Benz SL and 1978 or ’79 Chevrolet Monte Carlo

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Too bad it was rainy when Taylor spotted this Mercedes-Benz SL. On a nicer day it may have been driving around without its removable hardtop, like this example. It’s hard to positively identify the year of this SL, since they were built for nearly two decades without many exterior changes. Most year-to-year adjustments were made under the hood, but one significant change made in 1974 was the addition of huge “park bench” style bumpers which were designed to comply with US safety regulations. Many new cars in the US received unfortunate new bumpers for the 1974 so they could survive a 5 MPH collision with no damage.

We also appear to have a 1978 or 1979 Chevy Monte Carlo photobombing in the background.

1986 or ’87 Subaru Brat GL


This Brat was spotted in Park City, Utah a few months ago by a friend of mine. It is either an ’86 or ’87, as indicated by the lack of jumps seats and mounting brackets for head rests in the bed. 1987 was the last year Brats were sold in the United States, but they continued to be produced until 1994 for Europe, Australia, Latin America, and New Zealand. This example is very rusty, like most Brats are at this point. One thing that caught my eye immediately is the wheels. Most Brats still retain their original wheels, because the 4×140 bolt pattern was only used by Subaru and, oddly, French manufacturer Peugeot. Consequently, there are very few aftermarket rims out there, and this is the first (and only) time I’ve ever seen wheels like this on a Brat.